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Newest Tutorials

Photography » Technique — over 6 years ago
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The idea behind this series of tutorials is to walk you through the steps a photographer takes to reach their final shot, and the thought process behind those steps. There’s a long learning curve to taking a photo that you’ve never attempted before and this tutorial is all about helping you to cut out the time it takes to reach a shot you’re happy with.
Photography » Lighting — over 6 years ago
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Shooting at night for me, came about from the fact that I didn’t really have too much free time in the day, so I would go out and practice my photography with some friends at night. It’s a slightly harder skill to master because the shots take longer to expose, I liken it to shooting on film; you think a lot more about your settings and composition before you shoot, which helps you to hone in your skill much quicker.
Photography » Composition — over 6 years ago
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Dynamic tension is a way of using the energy and movement available in various features of the frame to draw the eye out of the picture in contrasting directions. We’ve already looked at a variety of different lines that you can use in a photo to make it more interesting, but dynamic tension takes these lines and adds varying degrees of contrast between them, making them much more interesting.
Photoshop » Photo Effects — over 6 years ago — reviewed, not listed
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This is a great little tutorial to play with, if you have an iPhone, and some spare time to get to grips with image editing software. It’s very easy to do and this step by step guide will walk you right the way through it. Feel free to leave a comment at the end with a link to your own results.
Photography » Tips and Tricks — over 6 years ago
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Shooting with the aperture wide open is a really good way of taking soft, naturally lit photos, as the aperture produces a shallow depth of field, and allow the maximum amount of light in. It’s also a great way of drawing the viewers eye to a certain part of the photo, as the majority of the photo will be out of focus.
Photography » Lighting — over 6 years ago
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Slow sync flash is when you fire your flash either at the beginning or end of an exposure that’s slower than normal, for example 1/8 of a second. Anyone with experience behind a camera knows that it’s very hard to hold the camera steady enough for a sharp exposure at this sort of speed, and that’s where the flash comes in. By firing the flash, you freeze the motion and collect light trails in the remaining time, creating this rather cool effect, like in the photos inside.
Photography » Composition — over 6 years ago
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If you’ve been following my basic composition technique tutorials, you’ll already know how effective the use of lines can be when composing a photo, and finishing off the lines section, we have perhaps the most useful; converging lines. There are various ways to use these lines with different degrees of effectiveness and that’s exactly what we’ll be looking at in this post.
Photography » Basics — over 6 years ago
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Understanding focus modes is key to getting the photo that you want in a hurry – it’s the difference between the photo being in focus and out of focus. You’ve probably struggled to focus in the past and not been entirely sure why it just won’t lock on exactly what you want it to, but don’t fear, this post will tell you everything you need to make sure you never lose focus again.
Photography » Tips and Tricks — over 6 years ago
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Colour photography has the strongest reproduction skills when trying to accurately capture a scene because it captures a full spectrum of colour. Black and white on the other hand shy's away from accurate reproduction and focuses on other visual effects such as tone, texture and shape. The difficulty is deciding which one takes precedence in a photo and how you capture it.
Photography » Basics — over 6 years ago
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There are many reasons to shoot on film rather then digital, and this post is all about those reasons. By the time you’re done reading, the question we no longer be, ‘should I shoot film?’, it’ll be ‘shall I bring my film camera or my digital camera with me today?’. Here’s what shooting on film does for you…
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