1. CSS
  2. Flash
  3. HTML
  4. Illustrator
  5. Java
  6. JavaScript
  7. Maya
  8. Photography
  9. Photoshop
  10. PHP
  11. Ruby
  12. Ruby on Rails
  13. 3ds Max

dave_aitch's Comments

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dave_aitch

Joined about 9 years ago.

clicked (15) — submitted (46) — commented (16) — saved (0)

avatardave_aitch about 9 years ago

You can download all of the files you need to complete this tutorial for free by clicking the link at the top of the tutorial text

avatardave_aitch about 9 years ago

Don't forget, you can download all the resources you need to complete this project for FREE by clicking link at the top of the tutorial text.

avatardave_aitch about 9 years ago

XML derives its name from eXtensible markup language, and was designed to transport and store data. XML is a markup language that boasts similarities to HTML, but it stores data rather then displaying it. The principles of the language are very similar, with opening and closing tags containing the information. These are known as elements and the one major difference is that XML does not have any predefined tags; instead, the author creates their own set relative to the document. An XML document by itself is very much a static document and does not do anything other than store information. To bring it to life, it needs to be styled and presented via a browser. To achieve this, other languages need to be called upon. These include XSLT to help style XML, and XPath to create queries from an XML file. This tutorial demonstrates how to create an XML file, use the correct syntax, validate the XML code, style it using CSS and XSL before finally putting it into action.

avatardave_aitch about 9 years ago

IN THIS TUTORIAL we will take an in-depth look at how to recreate a giant in the world of old-school video gaming. Defender was a game that was fast-paced and required tons of skill and a deep pocket of loose change back in the 1980s. The game revolves around defending a planet from the attacking aliens, as with most of the original arcade games. Defender was one of the first to feature side scrolling with a radar map at the top of the screen that enabled you to see exactly where the next wave of attackers was coming from. In the original game, the aliens would pick up little men from the planet’s surface and drag them into space, but this version will see them taking energy from the city on the ground. We’ll update the game to take advantage of faster processor speeds to give us detailed graphics and parallax scrolling landscapes. We’ve also included some of the original features such as side-scrolling, a radar map, and smart bombs that kill all aliens on screen.

avatardave_aitch about 9 years ago

Here we'll learn how to make a Flash jigsaw puzzle game using any artwork you prefer. It is fun, easy, and best of all it’s extendable! This tutorial will show you how to use Flash 8’s filters to make realistic puzzle pieces without using Photoshop effects. This will save you tons of time because you don’t have to render the effects in Photoshop and export each individual piece separately. You will learn how to make the puzzle pieces by masking the artwork, and then applying the Drop Shadow and Bevel filters. The benefit of this approach is you can change the puzzle artwork instantly by replacing the artwork PNG file. The puzzle pieces are randomly placed on the right-hand side and are draggable. As soon the player put it in the proper target (invisible movie clip), it will snap to the right position. When the puzzle is completed, it displays an animation and a button will appear that allows the browser to play again.

avatardave_aitch about 9 years ago

Recreating the gameplay of the classic arcade hit Pac-Man is a wonderful challenge for a game developer moving into more complex areas of Internet game development. It appears simple, but includes such features as bounded movement, collision detection, pathfinding and artificial intelligence, all of which need to be tackled. To aid in breaking down and overcoming these challenges, a smart developer would look to the benefits of using an object-oriented approach to coding. In this context, that simply means that distinct objects will maintain their own states and control their own behaviour, and in this tutorial that is exactly what we will explore. All of the code included on the CD for this tutorial is heavily commented, so we’ll steer clear of too much code to instead discuss concepts of how everything is put together, focusing on construction and design of the gameboard and levels.

avatardave_aitch about 9 years ago

If you started computing way back in the late Eighties/early Nineties before Windows was mainstream like I did, you would have more than likely been programming on a UNIX or even a VAX interface. This tutorial brings back a lot of memories of my first computing job where I was a database programmer working on a VAX using key commands – in those days, there wasn’t a mouse to be seen throughout the studio. So we are going way back to when Acid House hit the music scene and Margaret Thatcher introduced the poll tax in order to give you young upstarts a look at what we used to work with. This tutorial will show you how to implement a keyboard-controlled interface and also control video as well, which you weren’t able to do way back in 1989. The ActionScript will actually be timeline-based because this is not a code-heavy tutorial. Right, let’s get started before I actually start getting depressed about how old I am.

avatardave_aitch about 9 years ago

Creating websites for the average web designer is a bit of a minefield, to say the least. The most annoying problem is when a design looks great on a small monitor but looks completely lost on a high-resolution monitor. In Flash, we can solve this problem by creating a fluid, scaling site, which fills the browser. We can dictate exactly which elements scale up and which elements stay the same size. In this tutorial, our navigation, logo and content will not scale but will reposition if the browser is resized. However, our background image will scale up and down proportionally depending on the size of the browser. Because this will require fairly large images, we will also create an ActionScript 3.0 preloader with a loading bar. This kind of site-building still requires a basic page size in mind, but looks so much better than having empty space when scaled to large monitors.

avatardave_aitch about 9 years ago

The second part of our Swift 3D interface tutorial picks up where we left off from. This time, we will be concentrating on the real-time manipulation of the model in Flash, so we’ll utilise the Papervision 3D export we used before. This time, we are going to edit the core code that exported from Swift 3D so that we can add our own buttons and content and use the background as an animated real-time transition as we move from content to content. To do that, we will dynamically move the camera and the camera target, which is essentially what the camera looks at. That way, we can move from any one point to another, with Flash generating a smooth transition on the way.

avatardave_aitch about 9 years ago

Creating 3D interfaces within Flash is a fairly tricky task for even the most competent ActionScript coder. We are going to dabble in Papervision3D to create an interface, but this time we are going to feature Swift 3D, a low-cost 3D modelling package specifically aimed at Flash. Swift can output model files to Papervision and also sets up the basic code to get the model into a scene. We will concentrate on setting up the scene this month with textures and cameras, then next month we will play with the output files in Flash and add interactivity, turning our basic model scene into an interactive 3D interface.