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Photography Tutorials — Lighting

Photography » Lighting — almost 6 years ago
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The very premise of photography is rooted in light and, as photographers, it should be our goal to learn how to master it. Even the slightest change in the angle of light and a photograph can be changed drastically. This is especially true of portrait photography. Getting the light right when photographing a face can mean the difference between complimenting and even enhancing it’s features or making it appear unflattering by exaggerating any problems.
Photography » Lighting — almost 6 years ago
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When photographing lingerie and boudoir style images, it’s especially important to make sure the lighting is flattering on the model. There are few different techniques you can use to determine which light pattern works best, but as Michael Zelbel explains in the video below, one of the best ways is to experiment. Take a look and learn about an easy way to discover how different light and model placements affect the finished images
Photography » Lighting — almost 6 years ago
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Most studio photography is done on relatively small scales – a person or an object is lit, usually with between one and three lights that cover the breadth of the subject. Shooting something large is an entirely different story; there isn’t a soft box large enough to cover the size of legendary photographer Joe McNally’s (unpublished) project for National Geographic Magazine, which he discusses in this video from AdoramaTV.
Photography » Lighting — about 6 years ago
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A one light setup is simple yet effective, and apparently, easy to do as JP Morgan from the Slanted Lens explains it. He starts off by saying that “everything in the world is a ball, a cube or a cylinder”. A key light is used to highlight across the face, leaving a shadow line which drops into a deeper shadow. The core is the area that transitions from fill shadow to highlight.
Photography » Lighting — about 6 years ago
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Can’t afford those expensive studio lights for you photography set-up? Why not use flashlights? That’s what a group of photographers did to create some stunning images for the new social media site HeartStories. Production designer Rachael Currie came up with the idea to solely use flashlights to paint the scene, and with a long exposure and a couple of people running around waving flashlights, it was a success:
Photography » Lighting — about 6 years ago
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When shooting photos for a wedding, or for any other event, you want things to go quickly and smoothly, and so do your clients. Being able to make quick adjustments makes you less stressed and look more professional, plus it saves you and your client time. Wedding photographer Doug Gordon has created a tutorial showing how to set up an easily adjustable shoot and the importance of doing so:
Photography » Lighting — about 6 years ago
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For a long time, strobe units have enjoyed an untouchable place in the world of professional photography. Now, with the improvement of compact fluorescent bulbs, high ISO performance, and the introduction of DSLR HD video, continuous lighting is making a comeback in a big way. More and more, people are combining stills and video in the same shoot, and having a solid lighting setup can facilitate both needs at once.
Photography » Lighting — about 6 years ago
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In this video from Brady Bigalike of Noble Light Productions, we revisit the topic of light painting – a technique where the photographer uses light sources such as flashlights, LEDs, flames, and any other illuminating device to paint an image onto an exposing photograph.
Photography » Lighting — about 6 years ago
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Lighting painting certainly seems to be the trend lately, and photographer Dave Lehl couldn’t resist from trying it out himself. But instead of waving flashlights and glowsticks around, Lehl decided to grab a bunch of sparklers, tape them to some skateboards, and watch his friends do their crazy tricks as he photographs the whole thing:
Photography » Lighting — about 6 years ago
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This time lapse in motion, also known as a hyper-lapse, features panoramic views of both iconic architecture and everyday life in the historic Austrian city of Vienna. Shot during 14 days spread out over three months, photographers Peter Jablonowski, Fabian Orner, and Thomas Poecksteiner spent nearly 100 hours of post-processing and editing to craft the video you can watch .
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